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David Williams won $3.5 million finishing second in WSOP – Judi Online24jam

Glenda Conner 0

 

 

They met Shirley, too. As the tournament went along, she became a fan favorite. People shouted her name. ESPN, which was taping the event for broadcast starting July 6, interviewed her about her son and poker. By the end of the tournament Shirley was every bit as popular as her baby boy. “She was more popular,” David counters. “People actually said to me, ‘Oh, you’re Shirley’s son. I heard about you.’ I was a fan favorite by the end, and that was because of my mom. It was so great, because if I needed a card to win a hand, my mom would start chanting for it, and then the crowd would start chanting right along with her. At Judi Online24jam one point, when I was short-stacked, I needed a 10 or a club to double up, and the crowd started chanting with my mom: ’10, club, 10, club.’ It was awesome to be the fan favorite–for her and me.”

 

Brittany came out, too–she lost her job as a manager at the Electrique Boutique over it–along with some other friends who made the trip to watch David scream toward poker immortality. When he made the final table–a benchmark for poker players that, if achieved, gets their name whispered reverently forever after–the reality hit them hard. There were TV cameras everywhere, and the room was packed so tight you wondered if there was enough air to go around. One by one the players got picked off, until $5 million in Judi Online24jam cash was placed on the table and only two players were left to stake claims. One was a Connecticut lawyer named Greg “Fossilman” Raymer. The other was David Williams.

 

He’s never been a nickname guy. Too many poker players have shticks or nicknames or both. Unabomber. Devilfish. The Magician. The Master. There’s a never-ending supply of self-promoters with oversized egos. The closest David Williams ever got to a nickname came when he was about 10. Long before he knew what poker was, he wanted to call himself “Ace.” Ace Williams. He even approached his mom about getting it changed legally–at 10. She told him to try it out at school and come back later. If he still wanted to be called Ace after that, it would be fine by her.

 

“The kids at school made fun of me all day long,” Williams says, laughing. “It was brutal. That was the end of Ace.”

 

There are 55 people named David Williams listed in the Dallas phone book, but he never had trouble distinguishing himself. As a kid, he’d live with his grandparents when Shirley was flying for Delta. Rather than going outside to play, he’d stay in and mess with a computer game or his Magic cards – Judi Online24jam.

 

“I was always into intellectual hobbies more than sports,” Williams says. “I’m not very athletic, and that’s fine. I call it smart and lazy. I just don’t like to exert energy.”

 

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